Submissions
Semiotika
Submissions
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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • The submission implies that the manuscript has not been submitted or published earlier in any journal and is not under consideration for publication elsewhere.
  • The submission file have to be prepared in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF document file format.
  • Where available, URLs for the references have to be provided.
  • If necessary, the text employs italics, rather than underlining, and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed at the end of the text.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

Author Guidelines

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Submission guidelines
Semiotika publishes original papers, review articles and book reviews, annotated translations of semiotic primary sources to Lithuanian, academic discussions, conference reports. The journal accepts articles in Lithuanian, English and French.


Manuscripts should not exceed 40,000 characters (with spaces) or 8000 words. Recommended length of book reviews is 16,000 characters (or 2500 words) and more. Manuscripts and reviews have to be not been submitted or published earlier in any journal and not being considered for publication elsewhere. Manuscripts are reviewed by two external reviewers throughout double-blind review process (both the reviewer and author identities are concealed from the reviewers and the authors). To ensure blind-review process, please do not include your name anywhere within the main document (e.g. as a running head, at the end, or as explicit self-citation) and remove the authorial information from document’s properties. Papers which are not prepared by the guidelines will be returned to authors unreviewed.
Manuscripts should be submitted as a Word (*.doc arba *.docx) document and printed in Times New Roman 12-point font with 1.5 line spacing. The manuscript should include the authorʼs e-mail address, affiliation and a short bio on a separate, unnumbered page. The main document should not include any authorial information. Acknowledgements and details of support must be included at the end of the text before notes and references. Please number the pages of the main document in the right bottom corner and set page alignment to left justified.

Structure of the main document

  1. Title (14-point bold font)
  2. Summary (1,000 – 1,200 characters or 200-250 words)
  3. Keywords (5)
  4. Main text
  5. Notes (Notes should be given as endnotes before the list of references in 12-point font. They should be numbered consecutively in Arabic numerals).
  6. List of references (References have to be presented in an alphabetical order by authors’ surnames, please give only the initials of first and middle names. For details see Referencing)
  7. Summary / résumé in English (French) if the main text is in Lithuanian (1,000-1,200 characters or 200-250 words).
  8. Illustrations, tables, diagrams, figures should be captioned and placed at the end of the document. They should be clearly referred to in the main body of the document and numbered consecutively in Arabic numerals, e.g. <insert Fig. 1>) Illustrations have to be adapted for non-colour printing, they must have a resolution of at least 300 dpi.

Referencing
References should follow Harvard System of Referencing. References to a work or piece of research are placed at the relevant point in the sentence or at the end of the sentence in brackets. If you make reference without mentioning the author in the text then place the author’s name, publication year and number of the page in brackets. If you mention the author’s name in the text you do not need to repeat it in brackets.

Example:
As stated by Danesi, “It is accurate to say that semioticians today use a blend of Saussurean and Peircean concepts and techniques at various stages of analysis and for diverse purposes” (2007: 22).
“It is accurate to say that semioticians today use a blend of Saussurean and Peircean concepts and techniques at various stages of analysis and for diverse purposes" (Danesi 2007: 22).

A quotation of fewer than 40 words should be enclosed in double quotation marks and should be incorporated into the formal structure of the sentence.  Parenthetical citation before punctuation mark.

Example:
Saussure went on to suggest that of all sign systems language is “the most complex and universal” (1958: 68), and that this is so because “there are no pre-existing ideas, and nothing is distinct before the appearance of language” (1958: 112).
[from Danesi M. 2007. The Quest for Meaning A Guide to Semiotic Theory and Practice. Toronto, Buffalo, London: U of Toronto P, pp. 9-10]

Quotations longer than 40 words should be placed in a free-standing block of 10 pt. font typewritten lines, and omit quotation marks.  Start the quotation on a new line, indented five spaces from the left margin.  Type the entire quotation on the new margin, and indent the first line of any subsequent paragraph within the quotation five spaces from the new margin.  Maintain 1.5 spacing throughout.  The parenthetical citation should come after the closing punctuation mark.

Example:

As the following extract from the Cours shows, Saussure suggested that the main goal of semiology (should it ever come into being) would be to understand the social function of signs:

 

It is possible to conceive of a science which studies the role of signs as part of social life. It would form part of social psychology, and hence of general psychology. We shall call it semiology (from the Greek semeion, ‘sign’). It would investigate the nature of signs and the laws governing them. Since it does not yet exist, one cannot say for certain that it will exist. But it has a right to exist, a place ready for it in advance. Linguistics is only one branch of this general science. The laws which semiology will discover will be laws applicable in linguistics, and linguistics will thus be assigned to a clearly defined place in the field of human knowledge. (1958: 15-16)
[from Danesi M. 2007. The Quest for Meaning A Guide to Semiotic Theory

Note: For references to the books by three and more authors, when cited in text, list the first author and “et al.” for all in text citations. (Surname1 et al. Year – e.g. Nastopka et al. 2019).

For details see https://library.aru.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm (main Guide. Part 1: In-text Referencing).

List of References

List of references should be unnumbered. Referencing should follow Harvard System of Referencing. For details see https://library.aru.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm (main Guide. Part 2: The Reference List).

Basic examples

Books by a single author
Author’s surname, N(ame). Year of publication. Book title. Place of publication: Publisher.

Examples:
Fontanille, J. 1995. Sémiotique du visible. Des mondes de lumière. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
Cited in text: (Fontanille 1995)
Nastopka, K. 2010. Literatūros semiotika. Vilnius: Baltos lankos.
Cited in text: (Nastopka 2010)
Greimas, A. J. 1972. Essais de sémiotique poétique. Paris: Larousse.
Cited in text: (Greimas 1972)
Lotman, Y. 1990. Universe of the Mind: A Semiotic Theory of Culture. Transl. from Russian by Ann Shukman. London. New York: L.B. Tauris & Co Ltd.
Cited in text: (Lotman 1990)

Edited book
Editorʼs surname, N(ame). Year of publication. Book title. Place of publication: Publisher.

Example
Eco, U., Sebeok, Th. A., eds. 1984. The Sign of Three: Dupin, Holmes, Peirce. Bloomington: Indiana UP.
Cited in text: (Eco, Sebeok 1984)

Chapter in a book
Author’s surname, N(ame). Year of publication. Title of chapter. Title of book. Place of publication: Publisher, pages. 

Example
Eco, U. 1990. Unlimited Semiosis and Drift: Pragmaticism vs. “Pragmatism”. The Limits of Interpretation. Bloomington, Indianapolis: Indiana UP, pp. 23–43.

Chapter in an edited book
Author’s surname, N(ame). Year of publication. Title of chapter. Title of book. Editor’s name and surname. Place of publication: Publisher, pages.

Example
Elleström, L. 2010. The Modalities of Media: The Model for Understanding Intermedial Relations. Media Borders, Multimodality and Intermediality. Ed. by Lars Elleström. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 11–48.

An article in a journal
Author’s surname, N(ame). Year of publication. Title of chapter. Journal title volume number (issue), pages.

Examples
Elleström, L. 2018. A Media-centered model of communication. Semiotica 224, pp. 269–293.
Perron, P. 1989. Introduction: A. J. Greimas. New Literary History 20 (3), pp. 523–538. doi:10.2307/469351.
Broden, Th. F. 2012. Greimo ir Peirce’o semiotikos. Iš anglų kalbos vertė Dalia Kaladinskienė. Semiotika 8, pp. 55–75. Available at: <http://www.semiotika.lt/zurnalas-semiotika/wp-content/uploads/2012/Semiotika_8.55-75.pdf> [Accessed 5 June 2019].

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