THE BEGINNING OF HEIDEGGER’S CONCEPTION OF TECHNOLOGY IN HIS EARLY INTERPRETATIONS OF ANCIENT GREEKS
Kalbos ir pažinimo filosofija
Tomas Nemunas Mickevičius
Published 2016-11-04
https://doi.org/10.15388/Problemos.2016.90.10135
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Keywords

technology
machination
enframing
producing
being

How to Cite

Mickevičius T. N. (2016). THE BEGINNING OF HEIDEGGER’S CONCEPTION OF TECHNOLOGY IN HIS EARLY INTERPRETATIONS OF ANCIENT GREEKS. Problemos, 90(90), 57-63. https://doi.org/10.15388/Problemos.2016.90.10135

Abstract

In this article an attempt is made to explicate the influence that the early Heidegger’s interpretations of Ancient Greek philosophy had on his later conception of modern technology. It is shown, first, how the conception of Being as produced, which has arisen while searching for origins of Ancient Greek philosophy, reflects itself in the later thought on the modern technological opening of Being, named machination (Machenschaft) and, later, enframing (Gestell). Secondly, it is shown how one of the essential structural elements of productive behaviour (herstellende Verhalten) – namely the conception of causality – is important for the later explication of modern technological understanding of Being. And finally, it is shown how the early Aristotelian conception of tέχνη as a mode of truth (ἀλήθεια) or mode of being in truth (ἀληθεύειν) reflects itself in the innovative Heideggerian conception of technology as a mode of understanding of Being.

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