A Cyrillic manuscript appendix as a part of the Czech-Latin volume Hareticorum armatura from the library of the metropolitan chapter of St. Vitus in Prague, as a possible trace of F. Skaryna
Language contacts and contrasts: history and modernity
Илья Васильевич Лемешкин
Institute of Lithuanian Language
Published 2018-10-26
https://doi.org/10.15388/SlavViln.2017.62.11682
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Keywords

cyrillic manuscript appendix; Czech-Latin volume; metropolitan chapter of St. Vitus in Prague; recipe of ink; register of numerals; F. Skaryna

How to Cite

Лемешкин Илья В. (2018) “A Cyrillic manuscript appendix as a part of the Czech-Latin volume Hareticorum armatura from the library of the metropolitan chapter of St. Vitus in Prague, as a possible trace of F. Skaryna”, Slavistica Vilnensis, 620, pp. 43-64. doi: 10.15388/SlavViln.2017.62.11682.

Abstract

[full article, abstract in Russian; abstract in Lithuanian and English]

This article deals with the manuscript codex from the first half of the 16th century Hareticorum armatura (archive: Archiv Pražského hradu, collection: Knihovna Metropolitní kapituly u sv. Víta, sign. D.118), which is composed mostly of texts written in Latin and Czech. There is also a passage (Fig. 136–139) written in Old Russian with the Cyrillic script. On the flyleaf of the book, a record of its owner Liber mgri Johannis Hertemberger de Cubito can be found, which indicates that the book was being kept in the library of the Saint Vitus chapter (Jan Herttemberger z Lokte was the canon of the Saint Vitus chapter between 1480-1498) from the end of the 15th century.
Analysis of the book reveals a possibility that later, at the beginning of the 16th century or in the first half of the 16th century, another compilation was added to Jan Herttemberger’s volume, which contained a Cyrillic source. The fact, that the Old Russian manuscript was attached to the predominantly Latin codex, was apparently predetermined by practical thinking. The Cyrillic booklet was made of solid paper and as such could reinforce the seam line (binding) of the Latin book.
The Cyrillic text contains Latin glosses; in turn, the Latin text (Poggi Florentini ad Leonardum Aretinum epistola de morte Hieronymi Pragensis, f. 169v–175v) contains a Cyrillic note , which is to be found in the margins on f. 174v. These features indicate that the compiler or the owner of the codex was a literate Catholic of the first half of the 16th century, who mastered writing in Cyrillic script and knew Old Russian. Of all famous persons of East Slavic origin, only F. Skaryna is closely associated with the Prague royal court (the Prague Castle) in 1534–1539. The content of the manuscript (the register of numerals and the recipe of ink) can be linked to a private press (the pagination of Skoryna’s publications could be made with the help of the list of ordinal numbers).

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